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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
that gave him more latitude with the conservative base of the party. >> woodruff: speak of boston, and other places, let's hear now from our colleagues-- actually, ray suarez is in chicago. he and margaret warner are at the two presidential campaign headquarters, but, ray, we're going to come to you first. are you in chicago, and that's where president obama is tonight. >> that's right. he's just a few miles away. he's not here yet. and neither are a lot of the senior officials from the campaign. i think they probably want to wait to see a little bit more, but illinois senior senator, senator dick durbin is here, and there have been a lot of poll closings, a lot of projections, but so far no surprises. what do you need to see before you can really relax? >> some of the key battled ground states-- florida, virginia, ohio, and of course when we get in the midwest, a little closer to my activity in the last few months for the president, taking a look at wis cons and i know iowa. if we can get the job done in the midwest, and i hope we do glie you're not up this sickle. when you don't have a rac
with the romney campaign in boston and raw suarez at obama headquarters in chicago. >> it's the final frenetic day of the final campaign of his political career. the president ran from state to state starting in madson, wisconsin. the star power was kicked up a notch with an introduction from rock legend bruce springsteen. >> i get to fly around with him on the last day that i will ever campaign. that's not a bad way to end things. >> suarez: mr. obama called on his supporters not to be frustrated by the pace of change. instead, he encouraged them to send a message to those who blockedded his policies every step of the way. >> what they're counting on now is that you're going to be so worn down, so fed up, so tired of all the squabbling, so tired of all the dysfunction that you're just going to give up and walk away and leave them... leave them right where they are. pulling the strings, pulling the levers. and you locked out of the decisions that impact your lives. in other words, their bet is on cynicism. wisconsin, my bet is on you. >> suarez: the president also accused his republican rival of t
service at laguardia tomorrow.ag in washington, boston, newark, and new york's john f. kennedy, airport operations are returning to normal. flightaware estimates 2,800 flights were canceled today, down from a peak of almost 8,000 on monday. tomorrow, 530 flights have been officially scrapped, but that will grow, if as seems likely, laguardia has trouble opening tomorrow. add it up and airlines took a big hit from sandy. >> you can multiply 18,000 canceled flights by a few tens of thousands of dollars in revenue per flight and you're well north of $100 million in lost revenue. some of it they will be able to recover by flying flights more full over the next week, but a lot of it is gone. >> reporter: if it rolls on the ground, recovery will take longer. amtrak is providing limited service south and north of new york. but it gave no estimate for when flooded tunnels will be cleared and service restored into new york's penn station. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: the crippled transportation system is a big headache for fedex, joining us paul tronsor. he runs fed-ex' global
is chief investment officer at eaton vance management. he joins us from that firm in boston. duncan, i take it you're a pessimist in regards to avoiding the fiscal cliff that we're going to go over? >> not really a pessimist. i think the fiscal cliff is going to be more of a fiscal slope, but there will be a tax element to it. i think because we're starting at such a low level of tax rates, we're very likely to have higher taxes either immediately with the expiration of the payroll tax and potentially on capital gains and dividends in 2013 and beyond. >> tom: how should invests approach that, invest on what tax rates may be next year? >> not really. but there are great costs to be avoided by lessening the tax drag on your investment. positioning your portfolio and making sure you're in sthooks can outperform in a rising interest rate environment-- which is another thing we're worried about-- longer term makes some sense. >> tom: so rising interest rate environment, possibly higher inflation, higher taxes. not exactly the most shiny of forecasts for investors. >> well, there is something you
with making these choices. knowing what we know does philadelphia, does boston, does new york have to use a changed municipal math to run its daily affairs because of threats of these kinds of things? joe romm? >> well, i think as governor cuomo said, it's a new normal but we have old infrastructure. i think if f you listen to client scientists -- if we had listened to climate scientists who worned, no could flood like this, that storm surges were going to increase as the sea levels rose because of gobel warming and because of more intense storms we might have prevented it. now i think we need to listen to climate scientists who are warning that sea levels could rise, two feet-- as you heard-- by the middle of the century but three, four, five and six feet by the end of the century. so our choices are twofold. we should reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we're on the low end of future warming estimates and secondly we've got to start preparing for the storms that we are stuck with, like hurricane sandy. >> suarez: he used the word "prudence." what is prudent at this point? >> that's the q
to my former agency i think they absolutely would use them. >> rose: you just went to boston-- or to massachusetts to endorse elizabeth warren. >> yes. >> rose: who at one time thought might head up the consumer protection agency. that was not to be. >> right. >> rose: she wasn't even nominated by the president. >> right, right. >> rose: why did you endorse her? not that you shouldn't have, but why did you? >> she's my friend and i worked with her a lot. well, she was actually an advisory committee i set up at the f.d.i.c., to advicous consumer issues and how to make the banking system more accessible to lower income people. she was a tremendous help in that. and i worked with her when she became the chairman of the congressional oversight panel, nancy pelosi appointment, and we agreed a lot on some of the misuse of tarp funds. and when she became the special adviser to the consumer bureau, i was very supportive of the consumer bureau and tried to make sure the resources of the f.d.i.c. were there early on. we had several years of working together. we don't-- probably on fisc
states over the last 20 years. these figures correspond to cities like new york, atlanta, dallas, boston, los angeles, and they indicate how in the early 1990's, late 1980's, there was a very significant increase in the homicide rates. we have homicide rates all the way up to 60, 40, something like that. mexico's current homicide rate you can see on this tight. >> rose: 100,000. >> the rate is at 24 and has raised significantly over the last few years. what we have confronted is a increase in homicide rates not only in mexico but in all the hemisphere over the last few years. in the decade between 2000 and 2010 the homicide rate, the average homicide rate in all of the americas increased by 60%. so what we're doing in mexico is a fight for security. we are improving the rule of law. we are confronting these cartels, we're trying to bring them down, bring them to justice. we are transforming institutions devoted to the rule of law. and we are also going to the most vulnerable area of society to try to reconstruct the social fabric. of course we want to have much better results. >> rose:
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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